Our last visit to Uzès!

A few days before leaving France, Aaron, Sophie and I went to Uzès for the last time.  I wanted to pick up some fabric and a few other odds and ends before heading back to the States.  We casually walked around and I tried to soak it all in, knowing it would be awhile before visiting Uzès again.  I found the things I wanted and then we found Antoines’ partners boulangerie.  It was right in the heart of the centre ville and, of course, we had to try some pastries.  Bien sûr!  The presentation was so pretty and it wasn’t bad on the taste buds.  It was another lovely afternoon in Uzès!

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Les Baux de Provence

One afternoon Rebecca, Alexis and I headed to Les Baux de Provence!  I recorded a visit we made to this beautiful village back in the Fall, but this time around we discovered an old church, Saint Vincent, dating back to the 12th century and a few other “nooks” that I want to remember.

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Les Baux de Provence has one of the best savon de Marseille, soap of Marseille, boutiques.  I absolutely LOVE the little shop and when Alexis and Becca went inside they couldn’t get enough of the perfume.  Savon de Marseille is a traditional hard soap made from vegetable oil around the area of Marseilles for over 600 years.  This particular boutique in Les Baux de Provence has soaps in beautiful colors and scents.

Citron Vert

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Today I went to the store to pick up a few things.  One of the items on my list was limes. I can’t always find limes, so I was happy when I saw a few.  I picked up the remaining limes, 8 to be exact.  They were 5 for 1.50 euros.  At the check out counter the lady got to the bag of limes and looked at me and said, “These are 5 for 1.50.  You have 8.  That won’t work.”  I looked at her and said that was all that was left and I needed all 8 limes.  She then said, “Well, I don’t know what to do.  You need two more.”  She then looked at the other cashier and asked if she knew what to do because I needed all 8 limes but the store did not have any more and how was she supposed to do the transaction.  The other cashier did not know and so she had to make a phone call to the manager.  I was laughing!  How could this be a problem that she did not know how to solve?  What if I only needed one lime?

She talked to a manager and I was charged for 10 limes and I was told to go to customer service so I could receive a refund for the 2 limes that I was over charged for!  How funny is that?  I went to customer service and received 60 centimes (like 60 cents) for the difference.  France!

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While I was at the grocery store, Aaron was at the specialty pool store to get something for our pool.  He said the door was open and he noticed a worker in the back.  He walked up to the counter and said, “Excuse me, can you help me?”  The worker looked at his watch and said, “We are closed right now.  We will open in 10 minutes.  Please come back.”  Aaron politely walked out the open door and waited for 10 minutes.  After 10 minutes the man helped Aaron.  France!

The majority of stores in France will close anytime during lunch, 12-1:30/2 pm.  The French usually are not out shopping at lunch time.  They take their mealtimes seriously and those that work expect that time off.  It can be very inconvenient but we have gotten used to it.  The major grocery stores stay open at lunch time, which is the time I like to go shopping because I know not many people will be there.  They are all eating lunch! Speaking of lunch time, Aaron and I are going to miss our 1 hour and 20 minute lunch we have with Jack and Sophie.  I do love that my kids all get to enjoy their lunch time and they never feel rushed.

Buttons

Cultura is a store here that has a little bit of everything.  It is a mix of Barnes & Noble, Hobby Lobby, Best Buy, Toys “R” Us and a music store all in one.  I was looking for something specific the other day, and as I was walking around looking at everything I came across this display of buttons.  I smiled and took some pictures.  In America, whenever I have needed buttons for sewing or crafts I always ended up buying a card with 2,3,4 or more buttons attached.  Over the years, I came across a few specialty stores that sold individual buttons.  But, for the most part, I end up buying more than what I need.  I have a button box back in storage that is all the “extra” buttons that I never used.  So, when I saw this display I was happy.  They were grouped according to color and texture and stored in plastic tubes.  It was fun and different than anything I have seen in America.

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